Thursday, April 17, 2014

Tips For Graduating Students and Recent Grads Still Looking For A Job

If you’re still looking for a job, it’s important to take advantage of all
available resources through the RIT Office of Co-op and Career Services and develop a comprehensive job search strategy. Here are some tips and resources you may find helpful. You have FREE lifetime access to our office’s services! (Even after you graduate). Many resources and connections to social media can be accessed through our site.
1. RIT Job Zone is our job listing database. If you have not been using it - take advantage of it now. Before you leave campus, set up an alumni account so that you can continue to access Job Zone after graduation. Make sure your search criteria is not too narrow. Using multiple sources is smart – but don’t ignore some of the most obvious, like Job Zone! Have you uploaded your most recent resume? Set up a search agent that will email you with new postings, use it as a saved search. Instructions are on the main Job Zone page.
2. Follow up with all companies where your application is pending. If a company has your resume, and you have not heard from them, give them a follow up call or e-mail. If you have interviewed with a company, touch base with them to check your status and offer to answer any questions they may have.
3. Meet with your Program Coordinator (in person or phone appointment) for tips to strengthen your job search strategy. Your Program Coordinator is also a great source of job search resources and industry information specific to your career field. Get a job search diagnosis and move ahead with fresh focus. Double check your resume and cover letter - have us review them, perhaps there is room for improvement, especially as you transition from student to new grad.
4. Use resources to identify prospective employers. Find job boards and professional organizations specific to your field on our web site -- general sites like Vault, CareerSearch, Glassdoor and Internships.com that we subscribe to. There are also numerous major-specific lists to choose from. Here is a link to those Web Resources you may find helpful. Each of our program coordinators has gather helpful sites for their majors, you can find a list of them on the right side of this page or Web Resources page.
5. Think positively. Devoted time to your job search; strategize, plan, set goals and keep good records.
6. Be flexible. Be willing to move and work in a different geographic location than you had planned; consider doing a different kind of work or working in a different industry other than what you believe would be ideal; if necessary, consider a lower starting salary than you had hoped for – at least to start with.
7. Become active in professional organizations. Start establishing contacts; volunteer your time; ask about job search services or job databases that may be available to members. For more info visit Using Professional Associations.
8. Network! Networking is a critical part of how most people find their first jobs, and in a competitive job market it becomes particularly important. Join professional organizations and take advantage of every opportunity to meet and interact with professionals in your fields of interest, extend your knowledge of preferred career fields, find out who is hiring and get personal referrals to hiring managers.
Contacts are anyone you know - ANYONE. When first creating your list, don’t exclude those who aren't working in your field or due to thinking they may not know anyone of interest to you. You don’t know their network! Let your contacts know what you would like to pursue and ask if they know of anyone you could talk with related to your interests.
RIT’s Alumni Relations Office also provides graduating students and alumni with free access to the Alumni Online Community, which includes the Tiger Locator database. The Tiger Locator allows you to browse and connect with over 100,000 alumni contacts. Use the Advanced Search feature to find alumni working at companies you’re interested in!
LinkedIn is the online tool for professionals and a very productive way to identify employers, potential contacts, alumni groups, industry affinity groups, specific job opportunities (internships/co-op, entry-level, experienced) and much more. Like your resume, you should spend some time creating a very well-written LinkedIn profile and include links to an on-line version of your resume, your own blogs if appropriate (professional), and examples of your work. Connect with RIT alumni – under the Network toolbar pick, select Find Alumni from the drop down. Join the RIT Career Services group. Visit our Networking & LinkedIn page for more advice on using LinkedIn!
9. Consider the "hot" geographic areas. Review articles to identify areas with the most potential for your field. Read news from that area, use the web to identify employers/opportunities geographically. Contact a chamber of commerce for list of industries or employment fairs.
10. Register with at least one employment agency. Contract firms are doing more hiring these days -often times it is a good way to get the foot your the door. It should cost you nothing and does not take much effort on your part. But ask questions about how their agency works and what your obligation will be. Check out Working with Search Firms for more info.
11. Be Optimistic and Persistent. Inquire about each of your applications within a few days with an email or phone call. Be proactive - position yourself as a candidate that “wants the job the most”. One of the biggest weaknesses to a job search is being passive – make it easy for a potential employer to connect with you, effort should be on your part. Employers respond to job seekers who make the extra effort to write follow-up thank you notes and continue to reconfirm interest. 
12. Fake it - even if you are not feeling very confident, it is important to project a positive attitude. You have to believe you are the best person for the job before you can convince others that you are. Be prepared going into an interview. Preparation will alleviate some of your nervousness and you will appear more relaxed and confident.
13. Don’t give up. Everyone knows that the economy is not great right now – but that doesn’t mean that you should postpone looking for a job until it improves. Jobs are out there you just need to be more flexible and work harder to get one.
Good luck! And please don't hesitate to ask for help -- 585-475-2301.

Friday, April 11, 2014

Spring 2014 Student Newsletter


JOB ZONE E-NEWS Spring 2014
TOPICS:  Job Zone Tip| Evaluating Job Offers  | Still Looking for a Job? We can Help! | Upcoming Events |  Connect with us on Social Media

Job Zone Tip: Search Agents

How to Use Search Agents
Schedule a search agent to run and "ping" you with new job postings. Using the search agent tool in Job Zone is one of the most effective ways for you learn about job opportunities! Also use a saved search – saves time.
How To: Go to Jobs/select Advanced Search/check Save As check box/ pick your criteria (the less you pick the better)/Submit. Now this search will show on Search Agent Tab under Jobs. Select your saved search and Schedule it to run.

Evaluating Job Offers

It is that time of year when students are getting co-op job offers and graduating students are weighing jobs after graduation. An offer is comprised of more than a salary. Carefully weigh all the important factors listed below in considering the offer and don't hesitate to
discuss any questions or concerns you may have with your program coordinator in our office. (Visit our Evaluating Offers and Salary Negotiation page for more information).


§  Job content or nature of the work
§  Your future boss
§  Salary and benefits
§  Co-workers and corporate culture
§  Typical work week
§  Location
Acknowledge receipt of all job offers right away and pursue one of the following
options:

Accepting/Rejecting an Offer
Job offer options:
§  Stall - Not Ready To Make A Decision
: Express appreciation for the offer. Tell them that because this is an important decision you would like some time to carefully think about it. Agree on a reasonable time frame to get back to the company. You should not need to accept any offer on the spot. If you are waiting to hear back from other companies with whom you have interviewed, contact those companies and find out when they will be making a decision, informing candidates, and, if you can, find out whether you are being considered for the position.
§  Accept - You Really Want This Job: Show your appreciation for the offer. Ask the employer to confirm the offer in writing. Do not interview for any other positions. Reject all other offers immediately by telephone or e-mail. Report your job to the Office of Co-op and Career Services. 
§  Reject - Thanks, But No Thanks: Express appreciation for the offer. Say something positive about the organization and be diplomatic.
Ethics of Accepting/Rejecting an Offer
Once you accept a co-op job offer, even verbally, you must not back out, or renege on the job, to work for another employer. If you have any questions/concerns about this, discuss with your program coordinator before taking action! Good employer relations are vital to RIT's relationship with employers, and you, the student, are a critical link in this relationship. In addition, reneging on an offer could damage your chances of future employment with that company or with that person. Therefore, consider carefully before accepting a position.
§  Discuss offers thoroughly with employers so you understand the terms and reach a mutually acceptable date to respond to their offer. 
§  Request extensions from employers if you need more time to consider other offers. Do not ignore deadline dates you have agreed upon.
§  Notify employers that you are accepting or rejecting an offer as soon as you make your decision - never later than the arranged date.  
§  Once you accept a job offer, immediately inform other employers who have offers pending that you are no longer available (be sure to thank them for their time and consideration). Honor your acceptance of an offer as a contractual agreement with the employer. 
§  Cancel any other scheduled interviews or on-site visits.
Recommended Resources:
RIT Student/Graduate Salary page http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/students/salary. Compare you offers (co-op and entry level) with the data we collect from RIT students.
Glassdoor We have Unlimited Glassdoor access for RIT students and alumni! Glassdoor provides an inside look at salaries, reviews and interview questions posted by employees at over 100,000 organizations. Content includes actual interview questions and reviews for specific employers from previous interview candidates; specific salary, bonus, and commission details; and reviews of the company culture and working conditions
Salary.com Salary wizard, compensation, cost of living calculators, negotiation tips and more.

Still Looking For a Job? We Can Help!


If you’re still looking for a job, it’s important to take advantage of all available resources through the RIT Office of Co-op and Career Services and develop a comprehensive job search strategy. Here are some tips and resources you may find helpful.

Use all our Office’s services and resources. You have FREE lifetime access to our office’s services! (Even after you graduate). Many resources and connections to social media are through our site www.rit.edu.oce.

Meet with your Program Coordinator to have your resume and other job search correspondence reviewed and for tips to strengthen your job search strategy. Your Program Coordinator is also a great source of job search resources and industry information specific to your career field. Get a job search diagnosis and move ahead with fresh focus.

Continue to use RIT Job Zone to search for opportunities – make sure your search criteria is not too narrow. Using multiple sources is smart – but don’t ignore some of the most obvious. Have you uploaded your most recent resume? Set up a search agent that will email you with new postings, use it as a saved search. Instructions are on the main Job Zone page.

Find job boards and professional organizations specific to your field on our web site – from the Student page's top navigation bar, select “Web Resource Lists” on that page are general sites like Vault, CareerSearch, Glassdoor and Internships.com that we subscribe to. There are also numerous major-specific lists to choose from.

Attend career fairs, company networking sessions, info sessions and job search workshops – all listed on our site www.rit.edu/careerevents. There are often speakers and programs throughout the university as well that may spark an interest or offer a connection.

Networking is a critical part of how most people find their first jobs, and in a competitive job market it becomes particularly important. Join professional organizations and take advantage of every opportunity to meet and interact with professionals in your fields of interest, extend your knowledge of preferred career fields, find out who is hiring and get personal referrals to hiring managers.

Contacts are anyone you know - ANYONE. When first creating your list, don’t exclude those who aren't working in your field or due to thinking they may not know anyone of interest to you. You don’t know their network! Let your contacts know what you would like to pursue and ask if they know of anyone you could talk with related to your interests.

RIT’s Alumni Relations Office also provides graduating students and alumni with free access to the Alumni Online Community, which includes the Tiger Locator database. The Tiger Locator allows you to browse and connect with over 100,000 alumni contacts. Use the Advanced Search feature to find alumni working at companies you’re interested in!

Use LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com) an online tool for professionals and a very productive way to identify employers, potential contacts, alumni groups, industry affinity groups, specific job opportunities (internships/co-op, entry-level, experienced) and much more. Like your resume, you should spend some time creating a very well-written LinkedIn profile and include links to an on-line version of your resume, your own blogs if appropriate (professional), and examples of your work. Connect with RIT alumni – under the Network toolbar pick, select Find Alumni from the drop down. Join the RIT Career Services group. Visit our Networking & LinkedIn page for more advice on using LinkedIn!

Be Flexible. Be willing to move and work in a different geographic location than you had planned; consider doing a different kind of work or working in a different industry other than what you believe would be ideal; if necessary, consider a lower starting salary than you had hoped for – at least to start with.

Be Optimistic and Persistent. Inquire about each of your applications within a few days with an email or phone call. Be proactive - position yourself as a candidate that “wants the job the most”. One of the biggest weaknesses to a job search is being passive – make it easy for a potential employer to connect with you, effort should be on your part.

Employers respond to job seekers who make the extra effort to write follow-up thank you notes and continue to reconfirm interest.

Consider Temporary Agencies. Temp agencies or employment agencies provide another gateway into organizations or fields of interest. Temping or contract work is a great way to get your foot in the door, network, and prove yourself.

Target Growth Industries. Set your sights on industries and sectors that have strong hiring needs including professional, scientific and technical services; healthcare and social assistance; educational services, government, manufacturing.

Overall, try to remain positive – with persistence and a good job search strategy in place something will come through for you! Remember too that we are always here to help. If you would like to schedule an appointment to discuss your search, please contact us at 585.475.2301.

Upcoming Events

[for a complete list, visit http://www.rit.edu/careerevents]

ROC TECH SHOWCASE
Thursday, April 10, 2014
12-2pm Golisano College Atrium – Company Exhibits and Networking
Wondering what’s new & exciting in Rochester? Join us as local companies demonstrate and display their technologies!
Stop by and find out all of the interesting things many of our Rochester area companies are doing. ROC Tech Showcase is an informal opportunity for you to meet CTOs, business owners and computing experts, learn about local innovation, the skills necessary for success in the computing field, and what career paths and opportunities may be of interest to you! 
List of Participating Companies:
CaterTrax, iCardiac Technologies Inc, Innovative Solutions, IP.com, NimbleUser, OffSiteDataSync, OS-Cubed Inc, Paychex, Rochester Clinical Research, Rochester Software Associates, SMP, Star Fantasy Leagues, Inc, Syncurity Networks, The Gleason Works, Vnomics, Corp

At the conclusion of the showcase, RIT graduate, Tristan O’Tierney, co-founder of mobile payment company, Square, will speak in the Golisano Hall Auditorium at 2:30 that afternoon. His entrepreneurial success can be an inspiration to all of us!
All RIT students and alumni are welcome to attend.

Co-sponsored by the Golisano College of Computing and Information Sciences Dean's Advisory Board and the Office of Co-op and Career Services.

CAREER WEEK APRIL 7-11
  

“May the Odds Be Ever in Your Favor.” Let us help you navigate your way through the job search arena and come out a victor!  You will need training, a strategy and an ally.   Advice and free swag available throughout the week; candy, giveaways, RIT T-shirts and Hunger Games DVD’s – all part of the spoils available at the cornucopia! To request an interpreter for any Career Week events, go to: https://myaccess.rit.edu/2/

TUESDAY APRIL 8, 2014
Tick, Tock….Tick, Tock The clock is ticking but it’s not time to panic! Let the Co-op and Career Services staff help you navigate your way through the job search arena and come out a victor. (Offered Monday through Thursday)
11:30am-1:30pm
SAU Lobby

Don’t go Hungry, Hunt for Your Future: Finding the Right Career with Your Major
2-3pm
CCL Bamboo Room

Happy Hunger Games!
The job search games are tough even on the most experienced tributes. Come learn strategies for stress reduction to remain relaxed and in control.
3-4pm
CCL Bamboo Room
WEDNESDAY APRIL 9, 2014
Tick, Tock….Tick, Tock The clock is ticking but it’s not time to panic! Let the Co-op and Career Services staff help you navigate your way through the job search arena and come out a victor. (Offered Monday through Thursday)
11:30am-1:30pm
SAU Lobby

How to Evaluate Competing Job Offers
12-1pm
Eastman 3381

Find Your Own Haymitch: Meet-A-Mentor
(Food provided!)
12-1pm
SAU Interfaith Ctr, Skalny

How to Keep Your Winnings: 12 Financial Mistakes & How To Avoid them with Adam Mark
3-4pm
B&L A190

THURSDAY APRIL 10, 2014
Tick, Tock….Tick, Tock The clock is ticking but it’s not time to panic! Let the Co-op and Career Services staff help you navigate your way through the job search arena and come out a victor. (Offered Monday through Thursday)
11:30am-1:30pm
SAU Lobby

Become a Gamemaker
How I Became an Entrepreneur: With Tristan O’Tierney (co-founder of Square, a mobile payment company).
2:30pm-3:30pm
GOL - 1400

Victor’s Village
A panel of young professionals who have won the Job Search Games
5:30-6:30pm
SAU Interfaith Cntr, Skalny – food provided

FRIDAY APRIL 11, 2014
Prepare for Your Tribute Interview: Mock Interviews
Practice and get feedback on your interviewing skills.
9am-12pm
B&L Center
Update: This session is FILLED – you can make an appointment to practice interviewing with your program coordinator by calling 475-2301.

Connect With Us On Social Media

In the Office of Cooperative Education and Career Services, we strive to provide effective and personalized career education. One way we do that is by connecting with students, alumni, employers and community partners in their own language and on their own timeframe – through social media! We use social media to share information and events, create conversation and interchange, and respond to questions and feedback! We want to be the platform for employers to connect to YOU, and you all to connect to each other and our office. Visit our official accounts and join the exchange! Links to all of our social media sites can be found on our home page, http://www.rit.edu/emcs/oce/





We’re on Twitter

Co-op & Career Services uses Twitter to share the latest information, pictures, and resources throughout the day and during career events. We frequently feature advice, articles, employer visits, key dates, live tweeting of events and sometimes even giveaways. We like to converse with students and alumni by answering questions and tweeting back. Twitter is the most personal of all our accounts, so it’s the best to get primary information from us and directly connect to employers. Follow our account, @RITCareers

We Have an Interest in Pinterest
Food, art, fashion – and now career inspiration. Co-op & Career Services has joined Pinterest. Discover the latest advice on interview attire, resume writing, and words of encouragement like this: “If you can dream it, you can do it.” These words from Walt Disney are enough to get me through interviews! Find the latest career tips by following and repinning our boards, http://pinterest.com/ritcareerserv






Don’t Be Left Out: Become LinkedIn
LinkedIn is a professional networking site that allows you to connect with like-minded professionals, groups, and discussions. Networking is a key component of job and co-op searches; so begin now. Connect with Co-op and Career Service’s LinkedIn group, along with over 3,000 students, alumni, and employers! We have up-to-date job postings and discussions waiting for you. Visit http://www.linkedin.com/groups?home=&gid=4577501&trk=anet_ug_hm




Become a part of our timeline
We like you, will you like us on Facebook? Find the latest information about Co-op & Career Services events. We welcome shares, likes, comments, any engagement from you! Connect with our Co-op & Career Services Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/RITCareerServices







Be our “You” in “Youtube”

RIT’s Co-op & Career Services’ Career Channel provides relevant and engaging videos on job search strategies, career fair, interview tips, and much more. Videos feature our staff, co-op students, alumni, recruiters, and employers. You should view our videos and improve your skills! Visit www.youtube.com/user/RITCoopCareer   

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Matt Purcell - Orlando, Florida (Walt Disney World)





Where are you co-oping? Give us a brief overview of what your co-op is

I did two co-op terms with the Planning and Industrial Engineering department at Walt Disney World. My first was March-August 2012 where I supported clients from the Park Operations line of business. There I was primarily focused on projects at Disney’s Hollywood Studios related to attraction operations—wait time models, standard attraction loading procedures, and increasing throughput and efficiency. My second term was from August-December 2013 where I supported Distribution Services working on warehouse utilization, forecasting future SKU growth, and facility layout.

  How did you assert yourself into company culture?

The Disney Company is rich with heritage and culture. To align myself with the company culture I made sure to sign up for every opportunity the came along outside of my daily responsibilities. I took part in Cast Member activities such as recreation leagues, backstage tours, volunteer events, and signed up for front-line shifts in the theme parks some weekends.

How did you meet other co-op students, or interns?

There are thousands of college students working at Walt Disney World between Professional Internships (co-ops) and the Disney College Program there are a variety of opportunities to meet others. Most of my closest friends from my co-op came from intern housing and housing events. Also, I met tons of other interns during backstage tours, volunteer events, and at work.

What do you do outside of work?

Disney provides its Cast Members with unlimited admission to the theme parks—so I spent a lot of time riding rides and having a blast in the parks. Outside of work I spent a time enjoying the other attractions in the Orlando area such as SeaWorld, Universal, and Busch Gardens. Also, my roommates and I took day trips to Tampa, Naples, and Cocoa Beach. Also, during my first internship at Disney some friends and I flew to California to visit Disneyland. Orlando is a great place, there’s never a dull moment.

What’s your favorite part about the city/location you are in?

Orlando’s weather is beautiful. Although the summers are hot, the sky is always bright and blue. In addition to the weather there are more things to do in Central Florida than there is time to do it. Between the short distances to the Gulf or Atlantic Ocean, attractions, restaurants, professional sports, and festivals there is always a unique experience ready to be had.

 Give us your favorite co-op memory so far

My favorite memory from co-op at Disney was being in one of the theme parks before they were open for the day. There are few things as magical in the world as seeing the sunrise over the Magic Kingdom castle and realizing that you work there.

What’s one tip you would give to other students on co-op currently?


Get excited over any project work you’re given. Often, interns don’t get the most exhilarating responsibilities at first—but showing that you can put your skills to work on even the dull projects speaks a lot about your personality. Also, take time to network with the other departments in your company. It provides you a better understanding on how your company operates, sets you up for future job opportunities, and most of all it helps you know exactly what type of work interests you.